In This Issue​​


City of Columbia in a Class of its Own!

Erwin Officers to Begin Training for Emergency Services Unit

Red Bank Police Department Earns State Accreditation

Film and Video Copyright Infringement: What Your Parks and Recreation Facility Needs to Know about the Public Exhibition of Movies 


Trivia  Did You Know?

What citrus soft drink that was invented in Tennessee derived its name from moonshine?

Click here for the answer.

 

Message from the President 
 
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We have a first in Tennessee! The city of Columbia has stepped into the ranking of “the best” when it comes to its Public Protection Classification from the Insurance Services Office (ISO). ISO collects information on municipal fire-protection efforts in communities throughout the United States. In each of those communities, ISO analyzes relevant data using its Fire Suppression Rating Schedule (FSRS). Next, it assigns a Public Protection Classification rating on a scale of 1 to 10. Class 1 generally represents superior property fire protection, and Class 10 indicates that the area's fire-suppression program doesn't meet ISO’s minimum criteria. The city of Columbia is the first city in Tennessee to obtain a Class 1 rating.
 
The town of Erwin’s police officers are doing great things. This small town (just slightly more than 6,000 in population, according to the 2010 census) with limited resources is forming an emergency services unit. This unit is not intended to replace the current ambulance authority; instead, it will assist local fire and ambulance units in the area. As a result, the expanded response provided by the police officers is of immense service to the town’s citizens.
 
The Red Bank Police Department is the most recent agency to earn accreditation through the Tennessee Law Enforcement Accreditation Program. This program, created through the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police, encourages improvement among law enforcement and emergency communication services. There are 160 standards involved in the accreditation process, and the proofs of these standards must be met within a three-year cycle.
 
There are many notable initiatives currently in progress across the state, and we acknowledge each of you for striving to make your entities even stronger and safer.
 
Yours Truly,
Dawn R. Crawford, President


City of Columbia in a Class of its Own! 

Congratulations to the city of Columbia and City Manager Tony Massey for becoming the first city in the state of Tennessee to receive an Insurance Services Office (ISO) rating of Class 1. Columbia's "Public Protection Classification" rating is being upgraded from a Class 3 to Class 1. Columbia is one of only 97 communities in the nation, representing less than 1 percent of all fire departments in the U.S., to receive a Class 1 ISO rating.  

 

 
 
 
 
(Story published in the Erwin Record on March 26, 2015)
 
By Curtis Carden
Erwin Record Sports Writer
 
The formation of an emergency services unit is already taking hold in Erwin.
 
Erwin Police Chief Regan Tilson and Erwin Mayor Doris Hensley recently discussed creating a unit to help assist
local fire units and ambulances in the area.
 
“This is not to take the place of the ambulance authority, but to help when needed,” Hensley said during the March 9 meeting of the Erwin Board of Mayor and Aldermen.
 
It is an idea that the police officers are showing overwhelming support for, according to Tilson.
 
“In a small town, you know your resources are limited,” he said. “What we’re doing is maximizing our minimal resources, which is a big word for more training.”
 
One of the uses of the emergency services unit will be assisting with fires across Unicoi County.
 
“In most cases, in any emergencies, the first ones there are police officers. By nature of the business ... we’re already out, we’re on the road on patrol. So more than once, we’ve been the first to a fire. We’ll help until other firemen are there. Sometimes we can use rapid-suppression techniques to put the fire out quickly before it does spread and that’s important in a chimney fire or small electrical fire.
 
“A scenario, for example, is it is 2 a.m. and the officer is going to be there fairly quickly,” Tilson explained about a house fire. “If there’s someone in there, the officer’s not going to stay outside.”
 
While the officers already assist to a certain degree, the upcoming training will be with firemen and equip officers with equipment, Tilson said. The training will take place in a house with instructors at the fire department. Equipment put in use will be equipment currently owned by the town. There could be additional cost of some equipment, but the officers would likely use older equipment to assist before the fire department arrives.
 
“It wouldn’t be cost-intensive,” Tilson said. “It would be training-intensive, but that’s OK.”
 
There will also be training in conjunction with the firemen for vehicle extrication rescue.
 
“We're going to follow that along with ropes training,” he added, “in case you need some type of rope rescue, say down at the pond on the trail or a building collapses. They’ll be able to work with the fire guys so we’ll know what each other needs.
 
“That doesn’t take away from the role as a police officer. When they first arrive, they have to investigate, but the main thing is to save anyone who is injured then back out when others arrive. We want to use it to help free up the fire department.”
 
Along with fire, the officers will train with either MedicOne Medical Response or Northeast State Community College emergency medical responder training.
 
“MedicOne has already offered to provide the training for free,” Tilson said. “We’re just trying to mesh the two and hash out the details. When we’re first on the scene somewhere, we’ll have more knowledge.”
 
The police department already has an automated external defibrillator (AED) program in place to help provide early intervention during a cardiac arrest. The department also does refreshers every year while keeping their certifications every two years.
 
“EMS are the professionals there, so we’ll back out,” Tilson said, “but a lot of the time we can be there quickly. Sometimes EMS services can get overwhelmed. They only have two trucks, so if they’re out on calls, and another situation arises, this training will assist in letting our officers be efficient until EMS can arrive.
 
“Instead of just doing tactical SWAT training, they’ll be doing medical and fire training to help provide a better service for the citizens. To me, it seems the guys will have to make the decisions on where they’re needed most, but I have confidence they can do that ... they already are.”
 
Fire training for officers is expected to begin in the next two weeks while rescue training will take place within the month as details are finalized with MedicOne and Northeast State.
 
“We’ll take on more as training progresses to provide a faster intervention,” Tilson said. “Everything’s been ‘approved’ but it’s all about coordinating schedules, training and getting what equipment is needed for officers.”
 
Brian Glover, of Erwin Health and Homecare, purchased the first AED for the department.
 
“He really helped us with the program,” Tilson said. “He was involved in a crash and realized we didn’t have those. Health and Homecare provided them to us at his cost, he makes no money, just straight cost.
 
“Several local businesses, including Erwin Motors, have also donated. We also have an anonymous donor that buys pads, an AED or something each year for the department, but doesn’t want any recognition.”
 
The department has five AEDs that get switched with cruisers at the end of each shift, allowing all cruisers to be prepared in case of an emergency, Tilson added.



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Updated: Mar 17, 2015 10:14 PM CDT
By Greg Glover, Anchor

RED BANK, TN (WRCB)
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Red Bank Police Chief Tim Christol (L) and Sgt. Dan Seymour (R) show off the department's Tennessee Law Enforcement Accreditation certificate.
The Red Bank Police Department is the smallest of just 32 agencies state-wide to earn accreditation with the
Tennessee Law Enforcement Accreditation Program. Tuesday night, city leaders celebrated the achievement, the result of a three-year inspection of their policies and practices from paperwork to patrol.
"We want to provide excellence in everything that we do," said Chief Tim Christol. "This gives us the opportunity to look at our standards, to look at our policies, our practices, our training, and let our peers across the state come in and assess these same things and take a look and see how we're doing; give us some encouragement on the things that we're doing well; the things we need to improve on."
In the wake of the indictment of former Red Bank Officer Mark Kaylor on assault charges in a 2014 arrest, Chief Christol says he hopes this will demonstrate to the community that they set the bar high. "I hope they see this as, we're doing the best we can for them. We are not only, again, meeting those standards. We're exceeding these standards, every day."
Chattanooga Police Chief Fred Fletcher introduced Chief Christol at Tuesday night's City Commission meeting. In his remarks, Chief Fletcher reminded Commissioners that the accreditation will allow the Tennessee Municipal League to discount the cost of insuring Red Bank Police Officers, thereby providing a savings to employees and taxpayers.



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Film and Video Copyright Infringement: What Your Parks and Recreation Facility Needs to Know about the Public Exhibition of Movies

According to Swank Motion Pictures, Inc.®, you need a license to show that movie in the park.  The Federal Copyright Act (Title 17, United States code, Public Law 94-553, 90 Stat. 2541) governs how copyrighted materials, such as movies, may be utilized publicly. Neither the rental nor the purchase or lending of a videocassette or DVD carries with it the right to exhibit such a movie publicly outside the home, unless the site where the video is used is properly licensed for copyright-compliant exhibition.
 
This legal copyright-compliance requirement applies to parks, recreation departments, camps, community centers, aquatic centers, etc., regardless of whether admission is charged, whether the institution is commercial or non-profit, or whether a federal, state or local agency is involved.
 
The movie studios that own copyrights, along with their agents, are the only parties who are authorized to license sites such as parks, recreation departments, camps, community centers, aquatic centers, etc. No other group or person has the right to exhibit or license exhibitions of copyrighted movies.
 
Furthermore, copyrighted movies borrowed from other sources, such as public libraries, colleges, personal collections, etc., cannot be used legally for showings in colleges or universities or in any other site which is not properly licensed.
 
Frequently Asked Questions
 
What constitutes a public performance?
Any exhibition of a movie outside the privacy of a home setting is considered a public performance.
 
Do we need a license even if we don’t charge admission?
Yes! A license is required for all public performances, regardless of whether admission is charged.
 
What if a video store or equipment provider says it is okay to exhibit rented or purchased movies?
These stores rent and sell movies for “Home Use Only” and cannot provide legal permission for use outside the home. You can only obtain licensing directly from a licensor (such as Swank Motion Pictures, Inc.), not from a third party.
 
Who bears the responsibility if a film is shown without a license?
The management of the venue or premises where the movie is shown bears the ultimate responsibility and consequences of copyright infringement. However, anyone involved with the public performance of copyrighted material should seek compliance.
 
I own the movie. Do I still need a license to show it outside my home?
Yes! Neither the rental, purchase or lending of a videocassette or DVD carries with it the right to exhibit movies publicly outside the home.
 
I want to show an old movie from the 1930s or ‘40s. Do I still need a license?
Absolutely. Copyright pertains to all movies, regardless of the year it was produced.
 
A small group is having an informal gathering in our facility. Do we still need a license?
Yes! A license needs to be obtained, regardless of the number of people attending the screening, if the movie is being shown outside the home.
 

 
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Trivia — Did You Know?
 

What citrus soft drink that was invented in Tennessee derived its name from moonshine?
 
Answer: Mountain Dew