In This Issue


Membership Workshops

Guns and Public Buildings

Isbell Elected

TnPRIMA Annual Conference

Updated Loss Control Guideline

Welcome, Tammy Meyer


Tennessee Trivia

Q. According to the Tennessee Blue Book, what is Tennessee’s most popular nickname?

Click here for the answer

Message from the President

Dawn Crawford

Greetings to all,

Over the past several weeks, we have been busy attending numerous association conferences. These included the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police (TACP), Tennessee Association of Municipal Clerks and Recorders (TAMCAR), Tennessee City Management Association (TCMA), Tennessee Government Finance Officers Association (TGFOA), the Tennessee Public Risk Management Association (TnPRIMA), and others. We greatly enjoyed seeing so many folks at each of these conferences.

The November elections also created a lot of activity, including some changes on our board of directors. Mayor Ken Wilber of Portland is retiring from office, and as such, from our board. Mayor Wilber has been the chair of Public Entity Partners since June 2016 and will be greatly missed. With a unanimous vote, Mayor Curtis Hayes of Livingston has been elected as our new chairman. Mayor Hayes has been a staunch supporter of our organization and will continue to serve us well. Also approved was the motion for Mayor Randy Brundige to be elected as our vice chair. Filling the vacancy on our board for the East Tennessee region is Mayor Lois Preece of Niota. Please join us in congratulating all of these folks on their new positions.

Now that the holidays are upon us, here are a few tips for managing stress:

  • Do not be afraid of setting boundaries
  • Take time to take care of yourself
  • It is okay to say no when you need to
  • Let go of unrealistic expectations
  • Let go of what does not work
  • Do more of the things you want, and
  • Be true to yourself.

I wish everyone a safe and stress-free holiday season!

With warm wishes,

Dawn Crawford signature
Dawn R. Crawford
President/CEO

 

Member Workshops

What: Workers’ Compensation Basics

Description: These workshops will provide an in-depth look at workers’ compensation from the employer's perspective. Topics will include proper reporting and documentation of a work injury, medical treatment, medical bills, wage statements and best practices after a work injury.

Time:

9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

 

Dates / Locations:

Wednesday, Feb. 27

Spring Hill: Northfield Center
5000 Northfield Lane
Spring Hill, TN 37147

 

Thursday, Feb. 28

City of Gallatin: City Hall
Dining Hall 132 West Main Street
Gallatin, TN 37066

 

Wednesday, March 6

Atoka Town Hall
334 Atoka Munford Avenue
Atoka, TN 38044

 

Thursday, March 7

Jackson, MTAS Office
605 Airways Boulevard
Jackson, TN 38301

 

Tuesday, March 12

City of Kingsport
V.O. Dobbins, Sr. Complex, Douglass Room
301 Louis Street
Kingsport, TN 37660

 

Wednesday, March 13

Knoxville Public Works Complex
Community Room
3131 Morris Avenue
Knoxville, TN 37909

 

Thursday, March 14

Chattanooga Family Justice Center
5707 Uptain Road
Chattanooga, TN 37411

Lunch will be provided
Pending CMFO Credit Approval

Instructor:

Jennifer Orr Locklin, attorney
Farrar & Bates, LLP

 

Registration:

Call or email Heather Hughes
HHughes@PEpartners.org
800.624.9698

 

For questions about the workshop, please contact
Heather Hughes or Callie Westerfield
HHughes@PEpartners.org   CWesterfield@PEpartners.org
800.624.9698  

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Guns and Public Buildings

Many governmental entities have signage in and around facilities that restrict the possession of weapons inside the building. In 2018, the state law governing the ability for governmental entities to restrict the possession of weapons inside public facilities changed. If you have not already worked with your city attorney to determine if you are still in compliance with the new rules, you should do so soon, and also review any existing signage prior to January 1, 2019.

  1. Restrictions applicable to ALL PERSONS including handgun carry permit holders. This category allows the governmental entity to prohibit the possession of weapons by any person who is at a meeting conducted by, or on property owned, operated or managed by, or under the control of the government entity; or
  2. Restrictions applicable to ALL PERSONS EXCEPT HANDGUN CARRY PERMIT HOLDERS. This category allows the governmental entity to restrict the possession of weapons by any person who is at a meeting conducted by, or on property owned, operated or managed by, or under the control of the government entity, by allowing a handgun to be carried in a concealed manner only by persons authorized to carry a handgun pursuant to Section 39-17-1351 (TCA § 39-17-1359(a)(1)(A) and (B)).

In order to be in compliance with the state statute, notices must be posted in prominent locations at all entrances used by persons being prohibited to carry inside (TCA § 39-17-1359(b)(1)). The statute has very specific requirements about signage restricting all persons, including handgun carry permit holders, from carrying firearms in public buildings.

A sign prohibiting possession by all persons shall include the phrases "NO FIREARMS ALLOWED," measuring at least one inch (1") high and eight inches (8") wide, and the phrase "As authorized by TCA Section 39-17-1359." The sign shall also include a pictorial representation of a circle with a diagonal line through the circle and an image of a firearm inside the circle under the diagonal line. The entire picture must measure at least four inches (4") high and four inches (4") wide. The diagonal line shall be at a forty-five degree (45°) angle from the upper left to the lower right side of the circle (TCA 39-17-1359(b)(3)(B)).

In addition to the signage requirements, if your entity is restricting all persons, including handgun carry permit holders, from carrying on the property, your entity MUST provide the following at each public entrance:

  • Metal detection devices;
  • At least one (1) law enforcement or private security officer, adequately trained to conduct inspections of persons entering the property by use of metal detection devices; and
  • Each person who enters the property through the public entrance when the property is open to the public and any bag, package or container carried by the person must be inspected by the law enforcement or private security officer, or a representative with the authority to deny entry to the property (TCA 39-17-1359(g)(1)).

Exceptions to the above requirements do exist and they do not apply to:

  • Facilities that are licensed under titles 33 (Mental Health and Substance Abuse and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities), 37 (Juveniles), or 68 (Health, Safety and Environmental Protection);
  • Property on which firearms are prohibited by § 39-17-1309 (school property) or §39-17-1311(b)(1)(H)(ii) (athletic or school-related activities);
  • Any building in which judicial proceedings are held, whether or not judicial proceedings are in progress;
  • Buildings that contain a law enforcement agency;
  • Libraries; and
  • Facilities that are licensed by the Department of Human Services, under title 71, chapter 3, part 5, and administer a Head Start program (TCA 39-17-1359 (g)(1) and (2)).

Please consult your attorney to determine if a particular facility or building is not subject to all the requirements for metal detection devices and physical inspection.

Your entity can also choose to restrict weapons in public buildings for all persons EXCEPT handgun carry permit holders. The statute also has very specific requirements for signage that must be followed. A sign prohibiting persons, except those with carry permits, must be posted and include the phrases "NO FIREARMS ALLOWED" and "CONCEALED FIREARMS BY PERMIT ONLY," each measuring at least one inch (1") high and eight inches (8") wide. The sign shall also include the phrase "As authorized by TCA Sections 39-17-1351 and 39-17- 1359." The sign shall also include a pictorial representation of a circle with a diagonal line through the circle and an image of a firearm inside the circle, the entire picture measuring at least four inches (4") high and four inches (4") wide. The diagonal line shall be at a forty-five degree (45°) angle from the upper left to the lower right side of the circle (TCA § 39-17-1359(b)(3)(C)).

The statute allows each governmental entity until January 1, 2019 to replace existing signs with signage that meets the current requirements (TCA § 39-17-1359(b)(4)). Please be mindful of these requirements and the deadline within the statute to update any old or existing signage that is not in compliance.

This is not a comprehensive review of the statutes impacting governmental entities and their ability to restrict weapons in public facilities or buildings. Please consult your attorney to ensure that you are following all statutes impacting this area. It is also important to educate your employees on what weapons may or may not be prohibited.

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Isbell Elected to SACOP Executive Committee Position

Dyersburg Police Chief Steve Isbell

Dyersburg Police Chief Steve Isbell was recently elected Secretary/Treasurer of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) of the State Association of Chiefs of Police (SACOP). The position is part of the SACOP Executive Committee, with the term lasting two years.

Brandon Hutcheson
Source: Star Gazette Dyersburg News
https://www.stategazette.com/story/2558715.html

On Saturday, Oct. 6, during a State Association of Chiefs of Police (SACOP) business meeting held in Orlando, Florida, Dyersburg Police Chief Steve Isbell was elected to the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) of the SACOP Division Executive Committee. Isbell will serve in the capacity of Secretary/Treasurer, which is a two-year term.

“I am humbled by my opportunity to serve on the Executive Committee, and will continue to represent the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police and the law enforcement community to the best of my ability at the national level,” said Isbell. “I am truly honored to have been nominated by the SACOP membership.”

Isbell was nominated for the position by the Southern Region of SACOP; however, all regions take part in the Executive Committee election.

The Secretary/Treasurer, with assistance from the SACOP staff, maintains minutes of all meetings and assists the General Chair with the communications to the members and maintains the records of the SACOP Division. Responsibilities also include coordinating/overseeing an annually updated membership directory and assuming the role of SACOP Parliamentarian in their absence or vacancy. The Secretary/Treasurer serves in an advisory role regarding the SACOP budget and expenses, reports the financial status to the membership at the annual and midyear meetings, and advises the General Chair and the SACOP Executive Committee as to financial matters.

The executive Committee is the governing body of SACOP and shall have the authority to take appropriate action in the establishment of SACOP policy and to perform all other duties necessary to the accomplishment of SACOP objectives not inconsistent with the constitution.

Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police Executive Director Maggi McLean Duncan spoke of Isbell’s election, stating, “We are extremely proud of Chief Isbell’s election to the International Association of Chiefs of Police State Associations of Chiefs of Police Board of Directors as the next Secretary/Treasurer. He has been a diligent and conscientious representative of the Tennessee law enforcement community as a liaison to the IACP. He will certainly continue to elevate the reputation of Tennessee law enforcement at the national level in this new position.”

Dyersburg Mayor John Holden added, “I am very proud of Chief Isbell’s recent election to the IACP SACOP Board of Directors. He leads the Dyersburg Police Department with dedication, honor and integrity, and I have no doubt that he will be successful in his role on the board of directors.”

The Division of SACOP was established and operated in accordance with the IACP constitution, rules, and objectives, and as an integral part of the Association. SACOP has been an official division of the IACP, since the approval of a constitutional amendment at the IACP Annual Conference in 1977. SACOP serves as a coordinating body between the separate state associations of chiefs of police and the membership of the Association not holding membership in such separate state associations. It shall be the responsibility of SACOP, through its officers, to disseminate the views and needs of the membership of the state associations to balance the Association membership in such matters as suppression of crime, officer safety and wellness, police equipment, highway safety management, communications systems, training, legislative issues and IACP resolutions/model policies, and other such matters as may become apparent and necessary from time to time.

SACOP is divided into 4 regions, including:

  • Mountain Pacific – Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming
  • North Atlantic – Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, D.C.
  • South – Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia
  • North Central – Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin

The IACP is the world’s largest and most influential professional association for police leaders. With more than 30,000 members in 150 countries, the IACP is a recognized leader in global policing. Since 1893, the association has been speaking out on behalf of law enforcement and advancing leadership and professionalism in policing worldwide.

The IACP is known for its commitment to shaping the future of the police profession. Through timely research, programming, and unparalleled training opportunities, the IACP is preparing current and emerging police leaders, and the agencies and communities they serve, to succeed in addressing the most pressing issues, threats, and challenges of the day.

The IACP is a not-for-profit, 501c (3) organization headquartered in Alexandria, Virginia. The IACP is the publisher of The Police Chief magazine, the leading periodical for law enforcement executives, and the host of the IACP Annual Conference, the largest police educational and technology exposition in the world. IACP membership is open to law enforcement professionals of all ranks, as well as non-sworn leaders across the criminal justice system.

Chief Isbell is currently in his 29th year of law enforcement and has served the City of Dyersburg as a law enforcement officer since September 1992. Isbell became Chief of Police in July 2014.

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TnPRIMA Annual Conference

Excellence in Risk Management TnPRIMA Scholarship Award Winners Michele Diebold, Alyson Susong, Stacey Claxton, Karyssa Helton

Michele Diebold (left), human resources director for the City of Gatlinburg; Alyson Susong, recorder and judge for the Town of White Pine; Stacey Claxton, human resources generalist for the City of Shelbyville; and Karyssa Helton, rural planning organization / Title VI coordinator for the Mid-Cumberland Human Resources Agency

Danielle McKinley

Danielle McKinley, human resources manager for the City of Winchester

Risk managers and individuals with risk management responsibilities for their entity came together November 7-9 at the Tennessee Public Risk Management Association (TnPRIMA) Annual Conference in Franklin, Tennessee, to network and increase proficiency of risk management principles and practices specific to governmental entities.

In support of continuing education, Public Entity Partners awards six Excellence in Risk Management TnPRIMA Conference Scholarships each year. The 2018 award winners included: Jeff Brigham, codes and safety officer for the Town of Dover; Michele Diebold, human resources director for the City of Gatlinburg; Alyson Susong, recorder and judge for the Town of White Pine; Stacey Claxton, human resources generalist for the City of Shelbyville; Karyssa Helton, rural planning organization / Title VI coordinator for the Mid-Cumberland Human Resources Agency, and; Danielle McKinley, human resources manager for the City of Winchester.

Additionally, Bob Lynch, property conservation consultant with Public Entity Partners, has been named the incoming TnPRIMA president. Bob has volunteered with TnPRIMA for many years.

"I am very excited about serving as president of TnPRIMA in the upcoming year,” Lynch said. “In my previous position as safety coordinator for the City of Cookeville, the risk management education I received from groups like Public Entity Partners and TnPRIMA were very important to the work I did for the city. I am honored to serve in this position for the next year, and look forward to working with public entity risk management professionals across Tennessee."

Bob Lynch, property conservation consultant with Public Entity Partners and incoming president of TnPRIMA, and Jani Jennings, president of the international PRIMA organization. Bob Lynch, property conservation consultant with Public Entity Partners, and Matthew Marshall, city manager for the City of Norris and immediate past president of TnPRIMA.

Bob Lynch, property conservation consultant with Public Entity Partners and incoming president of TnPRIMA, and Jani Jennings, president of the international PRIMA organization

Bob Lynch (left), property conservation consultant with Public Entity Partners, and Matthew Marshall, city manager for the City of Norris and immediate past president of TnPRIMA

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Updated Loss Control Guideline — Municipal Use of Inmates, Probationers and Offenders for Public Service Work Projects

Municipalities are permitted by various state statutes to use municipal offenders, state and county inmates, juveniles deemed delinquent, and probationers to work on public service projects. These statutes are categorized based upon the status of the inmate or offender. A city or town can face different types of liability depending upon the type of inmate labor that is utilized, and several different statutes authorize municipalities to utilize them on public service projects. The exposure or liability your entity faces when using this type of labor depends upon the status of the inmate or offender worker.

To learn more about the different statutes that apply or the exposures your entity faces with different types of inmates, please review our loss control guideline, available online.

If you have questions about this guideline or how coverage may apply, please reach out to your regional casualty loss control consultant or your underwriter.

 

Loss Control Department

 

East Tennessee
Judy Housley
jhousley@PEpartners.org

Middle Tennessee
Chester Darden
cdarden@PEpartners.org

West Tennessee
Paul Chambliss
pchambliss@PEpartners.org

 

Underwriting Department
800.624.9698

 

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Welcome, Tammy Meyer

Tammy Meyer

Public Entity Partners is pleased to welcome Tammy Meyer as a workers’ compensation adjuster. With approximately 14 years of claims handling experience, Tammy was previously responsible for handling a multi-state jurisdiction. She also has prior experience as a workers’ compensation coordinator for a local urgent care physicians’ office.

Tammy will be taking over Pam Dickover’s caseload. Pam, who has moved out of state to be with her husband, will certainly be missed.

Tammy can be reached at tmeyer@pepartners.org at 615.371.6033 or 800.596.6516.

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Tennessee Trivia

Q: According to the Tennessee Blue Book, what is Tennessee’s most popular nickname?

A. The Volunteer State